Sea Scout Advancement Requirements, circa 1940s

Apprentice
1. Be fifteen years of age.
2. Know and put into practice in your daily life the Scout Oath and Law.
3. Explain and subscribe to the Sea Promise.
4. Know elementary safety rules regarding water activities and the use of small boats. Demonstrate the proper method of using the Life Jacket or Life Belt and Life Buoy.
5. Using both small and large rope, know and demonstrate the uses of the following knots: Square, Sheet Bend, Bowline, Fisherman's, Sheep Shank, Slip, Timber Hitch, Clove Hitch slipped over the end as well as tied around the middle of an object, Two Half Hitches.
6. Know the Sea Scout Uniform and Insignia, how to wear them, and how to fold the uniforms.  Be able to identify the Insignia worn by Ship and Council Sea Scout Officials.
7. Know the following customs and courtesies of the sea: the customary forms of respect due The Flag of the United States of America, coming aboard and leaving Ships, when and to what individuals the hand salute is given.
8. Present the written consent of his parents and present the physical examination blank completely filled out; both of these are to be placed on file in the Council office.  Make application to join a Ship or Sea Scout Patrol.

Ordinary
1. Sea History- Know the history of sea lore at to the origin of bell time, the double salute, side boys, and at least three nautical terms.
2. Boats and Boat Handling- Know the purpose and special advantages of each of the following types of boats: punt, flat-bottomed knockabout, dory, canoe, dinghy, kayak, catamaran, wherry, whaleboat, cutter, launch, motor sailor, self-bailing surfboat, motor lifeboat.  Know the principal parts of the type of craft most commonly used by your Ship.  Know boat etiquette.  Handle a rowboat or a canoe or all positions in a cutter crew.
3. Marlinspike Seamanship- Using at least 1" (circumference) rope, demonstrate and give the use of each of the following knots, bends, and hitches. Knots: overhand, figure eight, stevedore's knot, bowline, bowling on a bight.  Bends: square knot, sheet bend, fisherman's knot.  Hitches: clove hitch, two half hitches, timber hitch, rolling hitch, marling hitch, and hitching tie.  Know types of ropes, materials used, and the definitions of lay, strand, hawser, and cable.  Submit an eye splice, and whip the end of a rope.
4. Rigging of Sailing Craft- Construct a deck model of a small gaff, or marconi-rigged sloop or schooner, showing masts, booms, and spars in place, and standing rigging.
5. Ground Tackle- Describe three types of anchors, and give the advantage of each.  Construct a working model of any type.
6. Piloting- Box the compass to 32 points.  Construct a working relative bearings model (a ship on a compass rose), and be able to report objects in view or wind direction with respect to the ship.  Give evidence of a working knowledge of the Rules of the Road concerning a ship's lights, fog signals, whistle signals, and Right of Way.
7. Navigation- Outline on a spherical object the hourly meridians of longitude and the parallels of latitude at intervals of 15 degrees between the equator and the poles, and locate the approximate position of your home and three points chosen by the examiner.
8. Bridge and Quarterdeck- Demonstrate you know the seven watches and bell time aboard ship.  Submit a diagram illustrating the relation of bell time to clock time.  Send and receive sixteen letters a minute accurately by the International Morse Code, using a blinker.
9. Drill- Demonstrate you ability to execute and give commands in the School of the Sea Scout.
10. Swimming- Qualify for the requirements as outlined for the Swimming Merit Badge.
11. Boat Maintenance- Make a sea bag or ditty bag, demonstrating the use of a flat seam, round seam, and grommet eye sewed in canvas.
12. Cruising- Make a 24-hour overnight cruise where directed in a rowboat or canoe or other approved craft, under competent supervision and under instruction.
13. Safety- Know Abandon Ship Drill, Fire Drill, and Man Overboard Drill.  Give an outline of the safety regulations as applied to the type of craft you most frequently use.
14. Galley and First Aid- The Sea Scout shall be required to meet the requirements as set forth for the Cooking Merit Badge and shall give evidence of his ability to put up and ditch a tent and arrange for overnight shelter.  While on a cruise or camp, make a camp bed on the ground and sleep on the bed at least night; demonstrate you ability to stow gear and provision against wet weather and demonstrate his ability to transport his equipment on his back.  Submit a satisfactory menu and list of provisions for a three-day cruise.
15. Service- Present a service record of at least three months as an Apprentice Sea Scout, and present satisfactory evidence in the form of leadership or outstanding community or Ship service record, that he has put into practice in daily life the principles of the Scout Oath and Law.
16. Leadership- Be familiar with the duties of a Boatswain's Mate and the Crew method as applied to ship operation. Demonstrate his leadership in several games for crew recreation. Understand standard Ship Ceremonies.
17. Scout Organization- Give a brief history of the Boy Scouts of America since its inception.

Able
1. Sea History- Know the evolution of ships, beginning with primitive craft, the rowing galley, medieval ships, 19th Century sailing ships, the introduction of iron and steam, paddle wheel steamers, screw propellor, turbine engine, and diesal-powered craft.
2. Boats and Boat Handling- Know the methods of beaching pulling boats in a surf.  Know the theory of, how to improvise and make a model of a sea anchor.  Demonstrate how to handle one type of small craft under sail, for example, catboat, canoe, sloop, cutter, yawl, ketch, etc.
3. Marlinspike Seamanship- Submit a short splice, long splice, and back splice; a sample of rope wormed, parceled, and served; and a sample of round seizing, a throat seizing, and a racking seizing.
4. Rigging of Sailing Craft- Construct a deck model as required in Ordinary (using the same model if desired) including the running rigging and sails. Describe various types of sails and their parts.
5. Ground Tackle- Demonstrate the correct method of picking up a mooring.  Explain the operation of a windlass in anchoring, explaining the principle of operation of an old-fashioned anchor with special emphasis on the importance of the direction of wind and current or tide in relation to the bearing and speed of the vessel.
6. Piloting- Submit a sketch or construct a model of the buoyancy system of the United States give evidence of a working knowledge of the details of the Rules of the Road, as set forth by the Department of Commerce, under sail or power for your geographical location.
7. Navigation- Read in detail a Coast and Geodesic chart of a waterway, preferably one used by your Ship, identifying all markings on the chart.  Make a chart of a quarter-mile square area of water (or if a river, of a half-mile length) showing shore line, soundings, current, buoys, bridges, and other standard chart markings.  Demonstrate the use of tide tables.
8. Bridge and Quarterdeck- Know the various methods of signaling aboard ship and send and receive thirty letters a minute accurately by Semaphore.
9. Drill- Demonstrate your ability to execute and give commands in the School of the Crew.  See the Manual on Scout Courtesy, Customs, and Drill, BSA.
10. Swimming- Qualify for the requirements as outlined for the Lifesaving Merit Badge or qualify for membership in the Junior Red Cross Life Saving Corps.
11. Boat Maintenance- Give 10 hours of service in assisting in the building or repairing of reconditioning of a boat or canoe.
12. Cruising- Make a long cruise since becoming Ordinary, under competent instruction, covering two weeks. A series of overnight cruises, 24 hours each, may be computed to cover the two weeks.  Time spent in an approved camp at a Sea Scout Base or in attendance of an approved Regatta may be counted toward the Long Cruise Badge.
13. Safety- Set up or make a model of a breeches buoy, and demonstrate its use.  Describe all precautions for safety aboard ship in rough weather.
14. Galley and First Aid- Demonstrate your knowledge and proficiency in the requirements as set forth for the First Aid Merit Badge.
15. Service- Present a service record of at least six months as an Ordinary Sea Scout, and present satisfactory evidence in the form of leadership or outstanding community or Ship service record, that he has put into practice in daily life the principles of the Scout Oath and Law.
16. Leadership- Be familiar with the duties of a Boatswain and understand the proper keeping of Ship's records of the log, funds, attendance, and advancement.
17. Scout Organization- Demonstrate your knowledge of the objectives and scope of the program of the main divisions of Scouting: Cubing, Scouting, Senior Scouting.

Quartermaster
1. Sea History- Know the highlights of sea history from the earliest times to present day, including outstanding voyages of exploration and development, as well as US sea history with a notation of the leaders, the dates, their achievements, and the reason for these events.  Make a chart showing the course traveled by any one navigator.
2. Boats and Boat Handling- Teach and command a Crew under oars and sail.
3. Marlinspike Seamanship- Demonstrate or make a model of, and in either case teach the various types of tackle; rig two types.
4. Rigging of Sailing Craft- Describe and be able to make a sketch of the arrangement of and names of sails of the six following types of modern sailing rigging: lateen, cat, sloop, yawl, ketch, schooner.  Classify as to the types of rigging any three of the following: flatties, snipes, X-boats, sun rays, star boats, comets, inland lakes bilge-board scows, frostbite dinghies, or other type used in your vicinity.
5. Ground Tackle- Demonstrate and teach the correct methods of tying up to a dock and bringing a boat to anchor.
6. Piloting- Describe the markings and make a lead line or a model thereof.  Know the various types of logs used for measuring distance traveled by a ship.  Construct and demonstrate a pelorus.
7. Navigation- Construct a working model of a sextant, explain its use, and demonstrate the measuring of known angles.  Understand Day's Work, and make a dead reckoning table of a course between any two ports.
8. Bridge and Quarterdeck- Construct a set of International Code Flags of either cloth or paper.  Identify each flag and explain its use.
9. Drill- Demonstrate your ability to handle Ship's Company in the School of the Troop.  See the Manual on Scout Courtesy, Customs, and Drill, BSA.
10. Swimming- Qualify for senior membership in the American Red Cross Life Saving Corps. Candidate must be 17 years of age.
11. Boat Maintenance- Supervise the repair or reconditioning and fitting out and launching of at least one of the Ship's boats, either in the spring or after temporary repairs.  Lay out the plan and estimate the complete cost and time required in constructing a boat, or supervise the construction of a small boat.
12. Cruising- The candidate shall take charge of at least a 24-hour overnight cruise under competent direction, prior to which he shall submit in a written outline the organization of the crew with their duties, necessary boat and camping equipment, menus, a food purchasing list, the daily schedule, and any other details required for such a cruise.
13. Safety- Submit a written outline and explain the approved organization, necessary equipment and methods used in protection of a swimming party as set forth in the Scout Life Guard Plan (described in Swimming, Water Sports and Safety)
14. Galley and First Aid- Have completed successfully the standard course in First Aid as given by the American Red Cross.  The examiner may be a Red Cross examiner or an examiner from the Bureau of Mines, certified by the American Red Cross.
15. Service- Present a service record of at least one year as an Able Sea Scout which includes attendance of at least two-thirds of the Ship meetings held during the six months preceding his examination, unless justifiably absent.  He must be seventeen years of age, furnish satisfactory evidence as exemplified by his leadership, or community or Ship service and any other evidence that the Local Council may require, that he has put into practice in his daily life the principles of the Scout Oath and Law.
16. Leadership- Know the duties of a Mate.  Make a detailed outline of a program for Ship meetings for a period of one month.  Demonstrate his familiarity with approved methods of teaching Sea Scout Requirements.
17. Scout Organization- Demonstrate your familiarity with the plan of organization and the program of your Local Council.

Source: Sea Scout Manual, 6th edition, #3229, 1943 printing.